What Populism? Trump’s America Is Party Time for the Corporate Elite

By ROBERT WEISSMAN “Trump has converted the GOP into a populist working-class party,” Trump advisor and far-right economist Stephen Moore told Republican members of Congress at a caucus meeting. Well, advisor Moore, meet the Trump transition team. The leader of the would-be populist working-class party has invited rogues’ gallery of insiders—corporate lawyers, investment fund managers, … Continue reading What Populism? Trump’s America Is Party Time for the Corporate Elite

Do We Really Want Democracy?

Our founding fathers raised this same question! They didn’t want a Monarchy. But they also didn’t want a Mobocracy. John Adams, our second president, distrusted the masses and defended inequality among men and advocated a government by an Aristocracy based on birth, education, and wealth. Read Philip Kotler‘s article in Huffington Post >>

Democracy in Decline: An Interview with Phil Kotler

Philip Kotler’s upcoming book – Democracy in Decline: Rebuilding its Future describes 14 symptoms of a sick democracy: #1. Voter Literacy & Turnout  #2. Quality of Political Leadership  #3. Exceptionalism  #4. Public Trust  #5. Gridlock  #6. Money in Politics  #7. Gerrymandering  #8. Extremist Primaries  #9. The President vs. Congress  #10. Federal vs. State Governments  #11. Supreme Court vs. … Continue reading Democracy in Decline: An Interview with Phil Kotler

Capitalism at the Crossroads: An Interview with Stuart Hart

An interview with Stuart L. Hart – “the pioneer of sustainable business.” Hart is one of the world’s top authorities on the implications of sustainable development and environment for business strategy. He is currently the Grossman Chair of Sustainable Business at the University of Vermont. Previously, Hart founded sustainable MBA programs at Cornell, UNC, and … Continue reading Capitalism at the Crossroads: An Interview with Stuart Hart

Why is it so difficult to rein in Wall Street?

BY SUHAIB RIAZ, University of Massachusetts Boston; Sean Buchanan, University of Manitoba, and Trish Ruebottom, Brock University Reforming Wall Street has become a key issue in the ongoing presidential primaries. Bernie Sanders in particular has used his rival’s close ties to the financial industry, including speaking fees and political donations, to suggest Hillary Clinton wouldn’t … Continue reading Why is it so difficult to rein in Wall Street?

Why do we pretend Supreme Court justices are anything but political officials?

Eric Segall, Georgia State University The late Justice Antonin Scalia believed that the federal Constitution allows states to ban abortion, to prohibit consensual sex between two adults in the privacy of their home as well as same-sex marriage, to keep a prestigious state-funded military college all male and to start official legislative sessions (and high … Continue reading Why do we pretend Supreme Court justices are anything but political officials?

Why presidential debates need real-time fact-checking

Ryan J. Thomas, University of Missouri-Columbia In a 2012 column, former New York Times public editor Arthur Brisbane asked his readers if the Times should be a “truth vigilante.” Clumsily worded and unnecessarily dramatic, Brisbane’s question pertained to something simpler: whether Times reporters should fact-check assertions made by subjects and sources in the text of … Continue reading Why presidential debates need real-time fact-checking

Bernie Sanders: “To Rein In Wall Street, Fix the Fed”

BY BERNIE SANDERS in the New York Times: WALL STREET is still out of control. Seven years ago, the Federal Reserve and the Treasury Department bailed out the largest financial institutions in this country because they were considered too big to fail. But almost every one is bigger today than it was before the bailout. If any were … Continue reading Bernie Sanders: “To Rein In Wall Street, Fix the Fed”

Beyond Paris: what was really achieved at the COP21 climate summit, and what next?

Michael Hopkin, The Conversation As French foreign minister Laurent Fabius brought his gavel down on the most ambitious climate deal ever struck, at 7:27pm on Saturday December 12, 2015, applause broke out throughout the sprawling conference centre in Le Bourget. It spread even into the cavernous media centre that played host to an estimated 3,700 … Continue reading Beyond Paris: what was really achieved at the COP21 climate summit, and what next?