The ‘Terrorist’ in the White House

BY PHILIP KOTLER  The US has been downgraded in The Economist’s Democracy Index. It is now in the “flawed democracy” category. What is most disturbing is the President Trump’s attack on the idea of America. America is an idea, not simply a country. This is not an accident. What we see with Trump is a systematic targeting of all the institutions and … Continue reading The ‘Terrorist’ in the White House

Are We Kissing Democracy Goodbye?

BY PHILIP KOTLER & CHRISTIAN SARKAR – As President-Elect Trump and his “Corporate Cabinet” take over Washington – the American public will witness radical changes taking place in our institutions, policies, and regulations. These changes might undermine America’s position as the world’s leader over the past century. The billionaires and generals who make up Trump’s cabinet bring … Continue reading Are We Kissing Democracy Goodbye?

What Populism? Trump’s America Is Party Time for the Corporate Elite

By ROBERT WEISSMAN “Trump has converted the GOP into a populist working-class party,” Trump advisor and far-right economist Stephen Moore told Republican members of Congress at a caucus meeting. Well, advisor Moore, meet the Trump transition team. The leader of the would-be populist working-class party has invited rogues’ gallery of insiders—corporate lawyers, investment fund managers, … Continue reading What Populism? Trump’s America Is Party Time for the Corporate Elite

Democracy in Decline: An Interview with Phil Kotler

Philip Kotler’s upcoming book – Democracy in Decline: Rebuilding its Future describes 14 symptoms of a sick democracy: #1. Voter Literacy & Turnout  #2. Quality of Political Leadership  #3. Exceptionalism  #4. Public Trust  #5. Gridlock  #6. Money in Politics  #7. Gerrymandering  #8. Extremist Primaries  #9. The President vs. Congress  #10. Federal vs. State Governments  #11. Supreme Court vs. … Continue reading Democracy in Decline: An Interview with Phil Kotler

Why do we pretend Supreme Court justices are anything but political officials?

Eric Segall, Georgia State University The late Justice Antonin Scalia believed that the federal Constitution allows states to ban abortion, to prohibit consensual sex between two adults in the privacy of their home as well as same-sex marriage, to keep a prestigious state-funded military college all male and to start official legislative sessions (and high … Continue reading Why do we pretend Supreme Court justices are anything but political officials?

CALL FOR ENTRIES: Greed! A Video Contest from Econ4

The Econ4 network of teachers, professors, practitioners, students and others are working to shift how economics is understood, taught and practiced. We’re now launching a video contest to crowdsource as many short, 3 minute videos about “Greed” as possible. We will distribute many of these across our network and beyond. The contest is patterned after the … Continue reading CALL FOR ENTRIES: Greed! A Video Contest from Econ4

VIDEO: Corpocracy – at the Station Museum of Contemporary Art

Corpocracy is the absurd reality of our society in which corporations and their interests are allowed to have dominance over the economic and political systems. Through the subversive imagination, the artist works toward a transformation of social consciousness. WATCH: The show features 13 artists including, Beehive Design Collective, Michael D’Antuono, Ron English, Clark Fox, Kenneth … Continue reading VIDEO: Corpocracy – at the Station Museum of Contemporary Art

Corporate America’s Plan to ‘Misbehave Without Reproach

by Jon Queally, staff writer – CommonDreams.org An independent investigation by journalists featured in the New York Times on Sunday offers an in-depth look at the way American corporations have used the inclusion of “arbitration clauses” within consumer contracts to strategically circumvent judicial review of their behavior and immunize themselves from class action lawsuits –”realistically the only tool citizens have to fight … Continue reading Corporate America’s Plan to ‘Misbehave Without Reproach

Janet Napolitano: Why more scientists are needed in the public square

Janet Napolitano, University of California, Office of the President In this presidential election season, one thing is certain: candidates will rarely – if ever – be asked what they would do to keep this nation at the forefront of science and innovation. That’s a shame. The public dialogue about science is perhaps the most vital … Continue reading Janet Napolitano: Why more scientists are needed in the public square

Move to Amend’s Proposed 28th Amendment to the US Constitution

 House Joint Resolution 29 introduced February 14, 2013 Section 1. [Artificial Entities Such as Corporations Do Not Have Constitutional Rights] The rights protected by the Constitution of the United States are the rights of natural persons only. Artificial entities established by the laws of any State, the United States, or any foreign state shall have no rights under this Constitution … Continue reading Move to Amend’s Proposed 28th Amendment to the US Constitution

Free Online Class: “The Creation and Destruction of the Great American Middle Class (1930-2010)” with Professor Stanley Stasch

This course is an economic history of what happened to ordinary American people and families from about 1930 to 2010. From the late 1940s to about 1980 ordinary people and families in the United States enjoyed a tremendous increase in their prosperity and quality of life, especially when compared with the conditions that existed during … Continue reading Free Online Class: “The Creation and Destruction of the Great American Middle Class (1930-2010)” with Professor Stanley Stasch

Our Partnership with Huffington Post – Join Us!

We’ve just begun a partnership with Huffington Post – and we invite you to join us.  It’s worth repeating why we’re doing this: Capitalism must evolve to serve the needs of all citizens, not just the very affluent. Our goal is to discuss the 14 Shortcomings of Capitalism and systematically analyze the problems and potential solutions. … Continue reading Our Partnership with Huffington Post – Join Us!

WATCH: Hedrick Smith on Who Stole the American Dream?

Hedrick Smith is a Pulitzer Prize-winning former New York Times reporter and editor, and Emmy award-winning producer/correspondent. He has won most of television’s top awards including two Emmys and two Dupont-Columbia Gold batons for the best public affairs programs on U.S. television in 1991 and in 2002. His current best-seller, Who Stole the American Dream … Continue reading WATCH: Hedrick Smith on Who Stole the American Dream?

Judicial Obstruction of Economic Reform

Philip Kotler calls for economic reform in Confronting Capitalism and envisions a kinder, gentler capitalism (to paraphrase President George H.W. Bush). Economic reform is not something the U.S. judicial branch takes kindly too. While Kotler’s book includes 14 shortcomings of capitalism, there is little mention of the judiciary. In my view a fifteenth shortcoming in needed. … Continue reading Judicial Obstruction of Economic Reform

If 90% Market Share Isn’t a Monopoly …

… then I don’t know what is. Monsanto’s U.S. market share is 90% in soybean and 80% in corn seed sales (Dan Mitchell, Fortune). In the same article, Larry Robbins of the Glenview Capital hedge fund goes further and says Monsanto has “perpetual local monopolies.” They tie farmers to contracts for life. The Monsanto case is a perfect illustration of at … Continue reading If 90% Market Share Isn’t a Monopoly …